Drug Security Forum

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02 June 2021



02 Jun
10:00–11:30
Pavilion G, conference hall G2
Broadcast

The Evolution of the Procurement System: Global Trends and Technologies

Drug Security Forum
Panel Session

Continuity of supply, and sufficiency of drugs for all citizens, including in situations of exponentially growing demand, are key to a country’s drug security. In turn, drug security depends on how effective the government drug procurement system is. Various mechanisms are used both in Russia and worldwide to lower procurement costs. These include long-term contracts, direct negotiations with manufacturers, and risk-sharing. All these can be considered as potential instruments for modernizing the current government procurement and drug supply system. Today, not all regions of the Russian Federation can solve the problem of drug deficits. One important strategy for ensuring adequate supplies may be a transition to a centralized procurement system. This would encourage planning and interregional distribution of drugs according to needs, improve the government’s negotiating position with regard to cost reduction, and increase patient coverage by the government. What factors dictate the need to modernize the current government procurement system? What international practices could be applied to optimize the current government procurement system from the point of view of preventing drug deficits in all regions of the Russian Federation? What impact might the establishment of a federal centre on planning and organizing drug supply have on citizen support, and on implementing the Healthcare National Project and other federal projects and programmes? What risks might centralizing drug supply carry, and will switching to a centralized procurement system help improve the country’s drug security? What supporting decisions in healthcare and related areas need to be made in order to successfully modernize the procurement system?


Moderator

Vitaliy Omelyanovskiy, General Director, Center for Healthcare Quality Assessment and Control of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Panellists

Elena Astapenko, Director, Department of Pharmaceutical Provision and Regulation of the Circulation of Medical Devices, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Kirill Danishevskiy, Market Access Director, Takeda

Vitaly Dembrovsky, Director of Corporate Affairs for Healthcare and Public Health, Russia and Eurasia, AstraZeneca

Victor Dmitriev, General Manager, Association of Russian Pharmaceutical Manufacturers

Etleva Kadilli, Director, Supply Division, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

Timofey Nizhegorodtsev, Deputy Head, Federal Antimonopoly Service of the Russian Federation

Front row participants

Vadim Kukava, Executive Director, The Association of Pharmaceutical Companies «Innovative Pharma»

Airat Farrakhov, Deputy, Deputy Chairman of the Commission of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation for Support of the Development of Small- and Medium-sized Business

Alexey Fedorov, Expert, Russian "Union of Patients" Public Societies

02 Jun
10:00–11:30
Pavilion G, conference hall G3
Broadcast

Innovative Therapy: Access Code

Drug Security Forum
Roundtable

National healthcare priorities focus on improving citizens’ well-being, finding cures for difficult-to-cure diseases, increasing quality of life, and extending life expectancy. They also aim to promote widespread access to innovative drug treatments, gene therapy, and biomedical cell products. Global practices in securing access to modern drugs, however, present a number of difficulties. Besides regulatory barriers that prevent new drugs from coming to the market, developing innovative drugs requires substantial investment, which is reflected in their market price. Strategies for promoting drug innovations in clinical trials are tied to models of drug supply, among which the system of shared risk has been successfully used in international practice. In order to improve the supply of innovative drugs in Russia, a number of programmes need to be put in place to aid the development of a full manufacturing cycle infrastructure. There also need to be a range of incentives for domestic manufacturers of innovative drugs. No less important is the strategy of building long-term mutually beneficial partnerships on the pharma market. What innovative products and technologies will drive the development of present-day and future medicine? What initiatives will be able to stimulate the development of an innovative pharma industry that is attractive to investors, and which will promote the unhindered supply of innovative drugs on the market? What regulatory decisions may help stimulate research and development in Russia? Will the “odd man out” rule become the stimulus for supporting Russian innovations, or a threat to the competitive model of the pharma market? How well does the register of pharmacologically active substances support the goals of protecting the reputation of commercialized generics on the one hand, and protecting the intellectual property rights of the inventors of the original drugs on the other? How can the balance between the generics and innovation industries be maintained? How will the strategy of increasing export-oriented production impact the development of innovative technologies in Russia?


Moderator

Yekaterina Gracheva, Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists

Sultana Afdhal, Chief Executive Officer, World Health Innovation Summit (WISH)

Sergey Glagolev, Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation

Alisa Dzhangiryants, Director of Market Access and Pricing, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Grigory Ivliev, Head, Federal Service for Intellectual Property (Rospatent)

Oksana Monge, General Manager Sanofi Eurasia, Chair of the Board of Directors, AIPM

Alla Samoylova, Head, Federal Service for Surveillance in Healthcare (Roszdravnadzor)

Evgeny Shlyakhto, Director General, Almazov National Medical Research Centre; President, All-Russian Non-Governmental Organization "Russian Society of Cardiology"

Front row participants

Sergey Kutsev, Director, Research Centre for Medical Genetics; Chief External Expert in Medical Genetics of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Наталья Мокрышева, Director, National Medical Research Center for Endocrinology Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Daniil Taliansky, General Director, "Generium"

02 Jun
10:00–11:30
Pavilion G, conference hall G6
Broadcast

Digital Technologies in Medical Care

Drug Security Forum
Panel Session

The pandemic has accelerated the processes of creating an integrated digital information supply chain. It has also intensified the digital development of the drug supply industry by taking the drug manufacture control sector to a new level. This has spurred the launch of an automated system for monitoring drug circulation from the manufacturer to the end user. Consumers now have the opportunity to acquire non-prescription drugs at online stores, marketplaces, and pharmaceutical aggregators. A unified, vertically integrated medical information system, the switch to an electronic medical document flow system, mobile applications, and electronic prescriptions will together lead to a breakthrough, and make drugs more accessible and prevent shortages. An electronic patient register, which will help manage information regarding expenses, treatment status and effectiveness, will allow the government to build a foundation for procurement and targeted drug supply. Today, the digitization of the industry is an essential component of the trend towards a patient-centred healthcare model. Is the digitization of the drug market an end in itself, or rather a tool to improve the quality of drug supply? What digital solutions need to be introduced in the pharma industry to dovetail with this system? To what degree does drug labelling support the interests of regulators, the market, and patients? What are the expectations, and what is the current operational experience? What aspects of digitalizing trade in pharma products need special attention, and what are the initial results of sales by electronic prescriptions in Russia’s regions? What effective solutions can ensure continuity of drug supply in hard-to-reach and remote areas of the country? How do patients stand to benefit from target notification of their rights and available drug supply?


Moderator

Alexey Martynov, President, Association of Biomedical Cellular Products Manufacturers

Panellists

Timur Akhmerov, General Director, BARS Group

Konstantinos Varlas, Senior Managing Director for Core Diagnostics for Eastern Europe, Abbott

Boris Glazkov, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Rostelekom

Olga Golodets, Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank

Olga Kobyakova, Director, Federal Research Institute for Health Organization and Informatics of Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Evgeniya Merkulova, Deputy Director of the Department of Digital Development and Information Technology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Vitaliy Milke, Professor, Bauman Moscow Technical University; PhD in Computer science and Machine Learning, Anglia Ruskin University Cambridge

Christian Rommel, Executive Vice President, Global Head of Research & Development, Member of the Executive Committee, Bayer Pharmaceuticals

Front row participants

Aleksey Skatin, Deputy Chairman of the Board, Deputy General Director for Electronic Commerce, Russian Post

Konstantin Solodukhin, General Director, National IT Development Centre

Kirill Khromov, Director for Development, First Electronic Prescription LLC

02 Jun
12:15–13:45
Pavilion G, conference hall G2
Broadcast

Medicines for Children: New Tools and Technologies

Drug Security Forum
Panel Session

The rapidly changing situation in the children’s drug market in Russia requires a revision of the principles determining relations between ministries, medical institutions, public organizations, regional governments and pharmaceutical companies. The establishment by the government of the Circle of Kindness Foundation has served as a precedent for changing the way non-profit organizations, government, and businesses interact. It has impacted the redistribution of resources between state and charitable programmes in the interests of children. This new environment is creating opportunities to solve issues related to drug supplies for children. However, new risks are also emerging, and efforts need to be made to identify fresh approaches to organizing medical assistance for children. In Russia, a new drug supply sector is currently being built alongside the already children’s drug market. That means any successful practice, whether in Russia or elsewhere, needs to be considered in order to ensure access to the latest essential drug therapies. Why are there problems in the drug supply for children, and how might the supply of drugs to children in Russia become a separate industry? What are the most successful practices of drug supply for children today? Which patient groups are in particular need of an update to current drug supply models? What should be the role of the Circle of Kindness Foundation in Russia’s drug supply system? Should it focus on specific categories and diseases, or act as a drug supply lifeline? How can the Circle of Kindness Foundation impact supplies for patients with rare diseases? What government initiatives concerning drug supply for children are under consideration today, and which offer strong potential for implementation and expansion?


Moderator

Vitaliy Omelyanovskiy, General Director, Center for Healthcare Quality Assessment and Control of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Panellists

Elena Astapenko, Director, Department of Pharmaceutical Provision and Regulation of the Circulation of Medical Devices, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Elena Maksimkina, Director, Federal State Institution "Federal Center for Planning and Regulation Of Medical Supply Circulation"

Aleksandr Rumyantsev, President, Dmitry Rogachev National Research Centre

Alexandra Frank, Director, Producer; Founder, "Star On The Palm" Charitable Foundation for Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Children's Health Promotion

Akthem Fourati, Chief of Medicines and Nutrition Centre of Supply Division, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

Oleg Ergashev, Vice-Governor of Saint Petersburg

Front row participants

Olga Germanenko, Founder, Director, SMA Families Foundation

Yuriy Zhulev, President, Russian Hemophilia Society

Alyona Khmelnitskaya, Actress; Actress; Chief Executive Officer, "Star On The Palm" Charitable Foundation for Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Children's Health Promotion

02 Jun
12:15–13:45
Pavilion G, conference hall G3
Broadcast

Three Regulatory Keys to Ensuring Drug Availability: Pricing, Registration, Quality Control

Drug Security Forum
Roundtable

Regulatory changes and breakthroughs, for which the pandemic paved the way, are needed for patients to access drug treatment earlier, as well as for eliminating drug supply bottlenecks. The government of the Russian Federation has approved a special procedure for re-registering prices for the most popular medications on the essential drugs list in the event of their shortage. However, the current pricing system remains the key reason behind a number of drugs being withdrawn from the market. Amendments to federal legislation (Russian Government Resolution No. 441 dated 3 April 2020) have paved the way for expedited registration of certain drugs (in cases when quality testing is guaranteed). Nevertheless, the requirement for international manufacturers to conduct local studies when registering new drugs impedes commercialization. Switching to drug registration under general EAEU rules, as well as taking into account global best practices, will allow requirements to be harmonized between countries. In addition, it will bring the system closer to the European standard of registration, control, and circulation of registered drugs, based on principles of public access to expert reports by the regulatory agency. This approach will help improve the quality of state expert analysis, thereby ensuring that effectiveness is monitored and drugs are circulated on the market in a secure way. Ultimately, this will favourably impact clinical practices. What initiatives could help solve the problem of low-margin drug shortages and prevent foreign manufacturers from leaving the market when protectionist measures are taken? Is the external price regulation system sufficient in the Russian Federation? Is there room in Russia for value-based pricing and a system of internal price regulations? What decisions may help expedite registration procedures in the future and help commercialize new drugs which have been guaranteed to be safe? How can regulatory practices be harmonized in the common EAEU pharma market? Will integration into a common pharmaceutical market speed up or hinder the development of the pharma industry and drug supply in the Russian Federation? What regulatory initiatives could address drug quality, effectiveness, and security requirements?


Moderator

Aleksandr Petrov, Head of the Subcommittee on Circulation of Medicines, Development of the Pharmaceutical and Medical Industry, Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Health Protection

Panellists

Ugur Gunaydin, General Director, Russia and CIS, Amgen

Andrey Kolesnikov, Director for Government Affairs and Market Access, Teva

Valentina Kosenko, Acting General Director, Scientific Center for Expertise of Medicinal Products of the Ministry of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Timofey Nizhegorodtsev, Deputy Head, Federal Antimonopoly Service of the Russian Federation

Filipp Romanov, Director of the Department of State Regulation of Medicines Circulation, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Alla Samoylova, Head, Federal Service for Surveillance in Healthcare (Roszdravnadzor)

Front row participants

Sergey Klimenko, Partner of the Moscow Office, Head of the Russian Practice in the Field of Pharmaceuticals, Medicine and Biotechnology, Dentons

Vadim Kukava, Executive Director, The Association of Pharmaceutical Companies «Innovative Pharma»

Dmitry Rozhdestvensky, Head of the Division for Coordination of Work in the Sphere of Circulation of Medicines and Medical Devices, Department of Technical Regulation and Accreditation, Eurasian Economic Commission

02 Jun
12:15–13:45
Pavilion G, conference hall G6
Broadcast

Immunization as an Investment Attraction Point: How Will the Pandemic Change the Vaccine Development Market as a Whole?

Drug Security Forum
Panel Session

The pandemic has tested the immunization industry worldwide, and given it a new impetus. It has given rise to a trend of making next-generation vaccines which are safe, simple to produce, and potentially more universal. Today, enormous investment opportunities are helping to build new markets. These could help usher in a secure future – one in which innovative technologies are used to prevent new epidemics, new vaccines are employed in other areas of immunology, and effective efforts are made to combat new strains, serious infectious diseases, and a whole range of tropical diseases. According to analysts from Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse, the future coronavirus vaccine market may be worth over USD 10 billion a year. It is too early to forecast income from new vaccines, or to assess the impact the pandemic had on the vaccine market as a whole. However, regardless of whether the pandemic will impact only the current state of the vaccine market or will drive global changes in the future, COVID-19 provided the stimulus for opening new horizons in research and development. How will the pandemic impact the capacity of the global vaccine market? Will COVID-19 become a driver of global change on the market, and what criteria and risks may impact how attractive the vaccine development market will appear to investors in the future? Will projects related to virus research, the development of new platforms, and infectious disease prevention be more heavily financed? How might therapeutic vaccines prevent the spread of infection, and what is the risk of antimicrobial resistance? What innovative developments and severe disease-prevention technologies will offer the greatest promise for investment? Will pharma and biotech industries come to be viewed as more stable for investment?


Moderator

Dmitry Khalilov, Partner, Life Sciences & Health Leader, Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe & Central Asia, EY

Panellists

Igor Borisevich, Deputy Head, Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation

Jai Verma, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, Protecti Global Holdings, Ltd

Oleg Gridnev, Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation

Ann Egede Ottosen, Senior Manager of Supply Division, United Nations Children's Fund

Vladimir Khristenko, President, Nanolek

Mikhail Tsyferov, President, Member of the Board of Directors, Petrovax Pharm

Front row participant

Alexander Plakida, Chairman of the Governing Board, National Network of the Global Compact Association

02 Jun
12:15–13:45
Pavilion G, conference hall G7
Broadcast

Technological Sovereignty of the EAEU: Successes and Potential of the National Pharma Industry

Drug Security Forum
Panel Session

The common rules for circulation of drugs and medical products for members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU): Russia, Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, came into effect in May 2017. By 2025, a common drug and medical products market will be created in the five EAEU countries; by that time the rules for manufacture and sale of drugs and medical products should be completely standardized. At the same time, the national pharma industries of the EAEU countries are at different stages of development, which affects decisions adopted by the EAEU members on various integration issues. Preparation of the EAEU Action Plan (Programme) for manufacturing medical products has been on its way since 2020. This includes a plan to implement measures for stimulating manufacture of drugs and medical products in the EAEU, among them subsidies and tariff regulations, as well as government procurement support. This plan is aimed at synchronizing activities of the EAEU members on issues of support for their own pharma industries. What is the contribution and potential of Russian manufacturing in the EAEU countries for development of the industry? What successful experience of EAEU members’ protectionist policy can be highlighted as related to measures for support of the national pharma industry in government bidding? Manufacture of what strategically important drugs must be ensured on full-cycle principle in the EAEU? What should be the measures of government support for the national pharma industry (subsidies, reduction of customs duties, or priority access to the government procurement market)?


Moderator

Konstantin Ivanov, Host and Expert, Doctor TV Channel

Panellists

Dmitry Galkin, Acting Director of the Department for Development of the Pharmaceutical and Medical Industry, Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation

Sergey Glagolev, Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation

Aziz Dusmatov, Head of the Department of Science and Education, Agency for the Development of the Pharmaceutical Industry under the Ministry of Health of Uzbekistan

Aleksey Kugach, Head of the Department for Organization of Pharmaceutical Provision, Ministry of Health of the Republic of Belarus

Nikolay Kushnarev, Director of the Industrial Policy Department, Eurasian Economic Commission

Dmitry Morozov, General Director, BIOCAD

Petr Rodionov, General Director, Geropharm LLC

Alexander Semenov, President, Active Component

Front row participants

Marina Durmanova, President, Association for the Support and Development of Pharmaceutical Activities of the Republic of Kazakhstan

Stanislav Naumov, Chairman of the Board, Association of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers of the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU)

Vladimir Shipkov, Executive Director, Association of International Pharmaceutical Manufacturers (AIPM)

02 Jun
14:30–16:00
Pavilion G, conference hall G2
Broadcast

Strategies to Develop the Russian Pharmaceutical Industry and Ensure National Drug Safety and Security

Drug Security Forum
Panel Session

The COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on the problem of national drug security and has given a new perspective on growth strategies for the Russian pharma industry. Self-sufficiency and the domestic development of innovations must be placed at the heart of efforts to strengthen Russia’s pharma industry. Domestic manufacturing of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) must be built up, and an environment conducive to developing the innovative Russian pharma industry must be created. Facilitating the growth of full-cycle pharmaceutical manufacturing, as well as moving the focus of regulatory policy from building generics portfolios to creating and launching a full range of Russian-developed innovative drugs, may help achieve several goals. It could ensure the country’s drug security, and also help the competitive Russian pharma industry become a leader in global markets. What regulatory decisions and government incentives are needed to create a new competitive API industry? What forms of state support as well as statutory and regulatory innovations will help boost the innovative pharma industry in Russia? What mechanisms need to be developed to commercialize both Russian and foreign medical research and developments? What other steps to boost the national pharma industry could solve the problem of ensuring public availability of a wide range of drugs, planning the product mix, and preventing deficits? Would a protectionist policy provoke a conflict of interests, and would a strategy of offering preferences to Russian manufacturers become a barrier, limiting the market presence of international companies, and reducing the availability of drugs already registered in other markets to patients? Is the Pharma 2030 strategy capable of taking the Russian pharma industry to the international market as a confident and strong player?


Moderator

Yury Krestinskiy, Vice President - Head of Healthcare Industry, Sberbank; Chairman of the Expert Council, Institute for Public Health Development

Panellists

Andrey Ivaschenko, Chairman of the Board of Directors, ChemRar High-Tech Center

Alexander Mazhuga, Rector, Dmitry Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia

Stanislav Naumov, Chairman of the Board, Association of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers of the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU)

Vasily Osmakov, First Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation

Vikram Singh Punia, President, Pharmasyntez

Alexander Semenov, President, Active Component

Victor Fisenko, Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation

Front row participants

Elena Maksimkina, Director, Federal State Institution "Federal Center for Planning and Regulation Of Medical Supply Circulation"

Sergey Shulyak, General Director, DSM Group

02 Jun
14:30–16:00
Pavilion G, conference hall G3
Broadcast

Socially Responsible Business: the Pharma Industry in the Patients’ Interests

Drug Security Forum
Roundtable

Under the pressure of overwhelming circumstances, constituted by the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent isolation, a number of industries had to expedite their transition to new operating environment. Healthcare was no exception and transformation of the industry to principles of patient-focusing began in next to no time. The pharma business, solving the problems of quick and continuous access to drug treatment, has put patients’ interests as the foundation for adaptation of its business models. In the course of carrying out the project to ensure remote delivery of drugs, pharma companies have spared no effort to ensure continuity of the new service. An infrastructure was created that needed to comply with requirements established by the government of the Russian Federation to counter dishonest suppliers; drug labelling was introduced; special facilities were equipped for storage of reserved drugs, and courier departments were created. Right now, there is talk of switching to a system of drug reimbursement. Regardless of the reimbursement model chosen, it is already clear that the social role that the pharma business plays will increase, which will take it from the service provider category to the rank of a coequal partner. And in the event of successful cooperation between the government and business, there is an opportunity for carrying out new and even larger joint projects. How specifically can the pharma business help in implementing government social projects involving drug supply? Is the industry ready for increased social responsibility? Patient focus is one of the key trends in the medical industry in recent years. How can pharma companies promote its integration in the healthcare system? What patient support programmes have become noticeable on the global market? The essence of the pharma business is in providing socially significant services by supplying the population with drugs. Where is the line between business and charity? The COVID-19 epidemic demonstrated that given reduction of the regulatory load, national pharma companies are capable of fully satisfying the demand of the population for drug access. What is the potential today for statutory accommodation of negotiations processes between the regulators and business?


Moderators

Yekaterina Gracheva, Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

Alexander Sumin, Executive Secretary, Expert Council on the Circulation of Medicines, Development of the Pharmaceutical and Medical Industry of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Health Protection

Panellists

Hans Duijf, Vice-President, Russia and Belarus, Novo Nordisk

Maria-Anna Laemmli, President, Swiss Health Touris; Publisher, Swiss Health Magazine

Akthem Fourati, Chief of Medicines and Nutrition Centre of Supply Division, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

Stephan Eder, Executive Vice President, STADA Russia-CIS

Front row participants

Yuriy Zhulev, President, Russian Hemophilia Society

Vitaliy Omelyanovskiy, General Director, Center for Healthcare Quality Assessment and Control of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Sean Reilly, Vice President, General Director, GSK

Mikhail Tsyferov, President, Member of the Board of Directors, Petrovax Pharm

02 Jun
14:30–16:00
Pavilion G, conference hall G6
Broadcast

The Medicine Provision System: Improving Availability

Drug Security Forum
Panel Session

The drug assistance system for patients entitled to government support is currently lacking, with regional inequality in drug supply, a lack of brand choice, inappropriate expenditure of monetary benefits, duplication of benefit registers, and monitoring of treatment effectiveness all remaining problem areas. A development strategy for the pharma industry that is based on drug security principles must take into account the evolution of the drug supply system. Any efforts to modernize the existing system for benefit-entitled citizens and other groups of patients with serious diseases must be built on principles of improving its intrinsic tools and its ability to be integrated into a system featuring any model of drug supply, be it drug reimbursement, elements of co-pay, or anything else. The strategy must enable more citizens to be able to count on social preferences, expand the outpatient list of drugs, increase the preventive role of the outpatient sector, and stimulate investment in the pharma industry. What assumptions and objective factors form the basis of the current drug supply system? What tools will help better supply drugs to patients qualifying for benefits? What criteria define economic models of drug reimbursement that are most acceptable to Russia, and what models of full or partial reimbursement of drug costs may be the most effective? Is the Russian Federation ready for universal outpatient drug supply?


Moderator

Aleksandr Petrov, Head of the Subcommittee on Circulation of Medicines, Development of the Pharmaceutical and Medical Industry, Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Health Protection

Panellists

Natasha Azzopardi-Muscat, Director, Division of Country Health Policies and Systems, Regional Office for Europe, World Health Organization

Elena Astapenko, Director, Department of Pharmaceutical Provision and Regulation of the Circulation of Medical Devices, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Alisa Dzhangiryants, Director of Market Access and Pricing, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Gilles Carbonnier, Vice President, International Committee of the Red Cross

Natalia Kolerova, President, Novartis Group in Russia; General Manager, Oncology Department, Russia, Ukraine and CIS, Novartis AG

Timofey Nizhegorodtsev, Deputy Head, Federal Antimonopoly Service of the Russian Federation

Ekaterina Pogodina, Director General, Managing Director of Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies, Johnson & Johnson Russia & CIS

Elena Chernyakova, Chairman, Federal Compulsory Medical Insurance Fund

Front row participant

Dmitry Kudrumov, First Deputy Chairman of the Government of Kirov Region

02 Jun
14:30–16:00
Pavilion G, conference hall G7
Broadcast

How Will the COVID-19 Pandemic Change the Development Path of the Global Pharma Market? Events, Investments, and Trends

Drug Security Forum
Panel Session

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic must be based on solidarity and cooperation among countries, societies, and industries. The pharma industry has come to stand at the centre of a large-scale transformation of global economies and healthcare. Companies all over the world have turned their resources to developing a vaccine against the new virus, while continuing to respond to the growing needs of the healthcare system and patients. The expansion of production capacity has become one of the first steps taken by pharmaceutical manufacturers in response to the challenges of the pandemic. Taking into account the new environment, the innovative pharma industry advocates that governments of all countries should focus on constantly promoting open trade, as well as on strengthening and diversifying supply chains. The experience of designing COVID-19 drugs and vaccines has shown that the processes of drug development and commercialization can be significantly expedited without compromising safety. Today, the focus is shifting to recovery in the COVID 19 aftermath, and to strengthening the ability of the healthcare system to withstand future challenges. The pharma industry will naturally be at the forefront of these efforts. What lessons can the pharmaceutical market learn from the pandemic and lockdowns, and how is the pharma industry adapting to the global healthcare transformation? Was the revision of existing industry growth programmes sufficiently thorough, and what development priorities are coming to the fore? How did the economics of the global pharmaceutical market change under the pandemic? Will the pandemic affect the industry’s attractiveness to investors, both in Russia and across the globe? Will there be an intra-industry redirection of investment flows? How well did the drug supply system in Russia function during the pandemic, given the global context? What role might innovative pharma players have in ensuring that the key needs of the healthcare system are met in the new reality?


Moderator

Dmitry Khalilov, Partner, Life Sciences & Health Leader, Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe & Central Asia, EY

Panellists

Sergey Glagolev, Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation

Vitaly Dembrovsky, Director of Corporate Affairs for Healthcare and Public Health, Russia and Eurasia, AstraZeneca

Vadim Kukava, Executive Director, The Association of Pharmaceutical Companies «Innovative Pharma»

Alexey Repik, Chairman, Delovaya Rossiya (Business Russia); Chairman of the Board, Group R-Pharm

Alla Samoylova, Head, Federal Service for Surveillance in Healthcare (Roszdravnadzor)

Vladimir Shipkov, Executive Director, Association of International Pharmaceutical Manufacturers (AIPM)

Lyudmila Scherbakova, President, Bright Way Group

Front row participant

Kamil Saytkulov, Head of Communications and Government Affairs, GSK Russia

02 Jun
16:45–18:15
Congress Centre, conference hall D1
Broadcast

Drug Security at the Heart of a Robust Healthcare System

Drug Security Forum
Plenary Session

Global healthcare progresses in step with technological advances, and today there are entirely new algorithms for treating diseases. The COVID-19 pandemic showed that drug security is a top priority, both for the Russian and global economy. Factors such as drug quality certainty, as well as availability and long term continuity of supply (even in emergency situations) are key to national security. The challenges presented by the pandemic have become a powerful stimulus for the development of new mechanisms to ensure drug availability, conduct rapid clinical studies, and develop and manufacture Russian vaccines. For citizens’ convenience, information technologies and monitoring of drug circulation are being expanded. For a country’s healthcare system and pharma industry to reach a new level of stable growth, ground-breaking technologies are needed. These technologies are also essential to join the international pharmaceutical market, where biomedical cell products are a new driver. What can be done to improve the supply of drugs for preventable diseases, and how can supply deficits be avoided? How can regulation be changed from acting as a barrier to a catalyst for innovation? What steps can be taken so that regulations are harmonized on the EAEU common pharmaceutical market? What approaches to regulating gene therapy and biomedical cell products are required for the industry to grow and for innovative drugs to be created? How can national drug security be ensured? How can Russian citizens be guaranteed continuous availability of high-quality, effective, leading-edge drugs?


Moderator

Evelina Zakamskaya, Editor-in-Chief, Doctor Channel; Anchor, Russia 24

Panellists

Koen Berden, Executive Director for International Affairs, European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations

Hans Henri P. Kluge, Regional Director for Europe, World Health Organization

Mikhail Murashko, Minister of Health of the Russian Federation

Mikhail Myasnikovich, Chairman of the Board, Eurasian Economic Commission

Aleksandr Petrov, Head of the Subcommittee on Circulation of Medicines, Development of the Pharmaceutical and Medical Industry, Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Health Protection

Alla Samoylova, Head, Federal Service for Surveillance in Healthcare (Roszdravnadzor)

Veronika Skvortsova, Head, Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation

Henrietta Fore, Executive Director, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

Afshan Khan, Regional Director for Europe and Central Asia, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)